Call of the Ocean

I’d been waiting in the ocean for 4 hours … the sky was stormy and churning above me, pockets of light were lining the ocean silver. The waves were not very responsive. Every 15 minutes or so, a swell line would rear up and pretend to strike but then subside quickly. Nevertheless I waited, curious to see if what I instinctively knew was sleeping, would awake. Then all of a sudden, this monster reared its head like a dragon and ferociously bit into the oceans surface, leaving me in awe. Then, it was gone again.

For more than a decade, Australian wave photographer, Philip Thurston has been training his eye daily to document the most powerful and beautiful moments of the breaking waves on the south-eastern coast of New South Wales. “I see photography as a kind of treasure hunting; the gold is out there, hidden within the moments of time…” he says. Keeping still is the essence. “I don’t create the waves, nor did I have anything to do with the organising of the elements. What I do is learn how to show up at the right time and encapsulate the moment into a frame.”

Credit: Philip Thurston

Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston
Credit: Philip Thurston


‘Poseidon: God of the Seas’ by Rachel Talibart

Working with high shutter speeds, the English photographer, Rachael Talibart freezes water in time, immortalizing each wave of the seas. Ger passion for stormy weather was shaped by her childhood on the south coast of England, and like Thurston, her sensitivity in capturing waves has made her a premier outdoor photographer. This unique photo captures the uncanny moment when what appears to be the Greek sea god, Poseidon rising from the rough seas.

Credit: Rachel Talibart

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